Wonder What the $25,000 Kickstarter Budget is going to do?

Kickstarter

Kickstarter (Photo credit: Scott Beale)

If you are like some people, you might be wondering why we need $25,000. We need it to compensate for the campaign pre-kickstarter and post-kickstarter money that we have put out.

That amounts to about $12,500 and then from there we have to pay for the digitally scanned images, the pricey lawyer that advises us on copyright issues and of course the price to maintain social media and marketing campaigns.

We hope that people will want to see our finished idea.

It’s something that we have worked years for. We know that you might be confused as to what the website will be like when we are done. Don’t be. We will have a free site, meaning you can get on there and look it over, scroll and research. But we will request a fee for digital downloads.

Pulpimages.com right now is only a site that is sitting still, waiting for the day that we make that Kickstarter  campaign goal.

We encourage you to fund us today. Kickstarter is a 50/50 chance, and we have hope that even though we have 9 days left, we might make it. When you share our goals with your comic lover, pulp lover or history lover friends-we know that you are thinking of us. We want to be able to save this great treasure inside and out.

 

So if you have any questions please feel free to contact us. If you want to help, contact us! Share us and like us today!

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Scandelous Pulp: Why We Love it

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (January 1937, vol. 29, no. 1) featuring Children of the Bat by Seabury Quinn. Covert art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (May 1938, vol. 31, no. 5) featuring Thunder in the Dawn (an Elak novella) by Henry Kuttner. Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Magic Carp...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Magic Carpet Magazine (April 1933, vol. 3, no. 2). Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Magic Carp...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Magic Carpet Magazine (October 1933, vol. 3, no. 4). Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (May 1935, vol. 25, no. 5) featuring The Death Cry by Arthur B. Reeve. Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (March 1936, vol. 27, no. 3) featuring The Albino Deaths by Ronal Kayser. Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (December 1934, vol. 24, no. 6) featuring A Witch Shall be Born by Robert E. Howard. Cover by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (April 1934, vol. 23, no. 4) featuring Satan’s Garden by E. Hoffmann Price. Cover by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

046a Weird Tales Apr-1934 Cover by Margaret Br...

046a Weird Tales Apr-1934 Cover by Margaret Brundage – Includes Satan’s Garden Part 1 of 2 by E. Hoffmann Price (Photo credit: California Cthulhu (Will Hart))

003c Oriental Stories Sum-1932 Cover by Margar...

003c Oriental Stories Sum-1932 Cover by Margaret Brundage Includes a Letter by E. Hoffmann Price (Photo credit: California Cthulhu (Will Hart))

Back in the day there was a woman named Margaret Brundage, and what is she famous for? Causing the whole nation to utter that word “scandelous”. How? Well her covers on pulp image magazines were racy and explosive.

She was active in politics, and an independent woman living in the age when men were the only ones entitled to take care of business.

Wanna see why she was so racy?

tumblr_lyh1zwEcsy1qa70eyo1_500 images tumblr_mg9gddPyQk1qii7l6o1_400 margaret-brundage Margaret_Brundage

Pulp History: The Newsstand

 

Check out these amazing images of people from the Great Depression buying and reading Pulp! Our Kickstarter campaign could use your funding to help preserve these wonderful images.

 

Thanks to the federal government we have access to these images. Can you see the pulp art in any of them?

 

 

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