More about Kickstarter

You’ve been with us since April & we’ve been keeping you posted on the time leading up to the launch of our Kickstarter campaign. Now is the time we need you to take some action & help fund our dreams to keep pulp art alive! Hopefully you’ve liked us on Facebook by now. But maybe you’re a little unsure of what’s the next step or what this whole Kickstarter thing is about.

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For those of you who know what Kickstarter is, you know how important your support is.  If you’re new to Kickstarter, it is an innovative way to fund creative projects in art, theater, technology, photography, film, video, food, the list goes on.
Thanks for following us this far, no matter which platform you use, but we really need you on Kickstarter.  A pledge of as low as $1 will keep you in the loop with our updates and let you know exactly what is going on and where we are headed.  We are continuing to work hard to bring our searchable Pulpimages database to life and need your help on Kickstarter to make it happen!

 

Joining us
You’ll need a Kickstarter account, it’s easy, just back the project and follow the prompts.  All financial transactions are securely handled through Amazon.  If you don’t have an account, it will take an extra minute to enter your credit card and address info.  You won’t be charged until our project is successful!

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The Figurine

Plans for the figurine are taking shape… LITERALLY! It all started with a pulp image and one 3D artist, Grego. We just got pictures of the prototype and we don’t want to jinx it, but it looks AWESOME!

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This little guy will be available in his finished form for backers of our Kickstarter campaign who back us at the $35 level. This 3D 3inch cast resin figurine comes from a Startling Stories poster and is brought to life by Grego. Along with the figurine, you’ll also be at Alien at Alien Status and get three digital images.

Scandelous Pulp: Why We Love it

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (January 1937, vol. 29, no. 1) featuring Children of the Bat by Seabury Quinn. Covert art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (May 1938, vol. 31, no. 5) featuring Thunder in the Dawn (an Elak novella) by Henry Kuttner. Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Magic Carp...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Magic Carpet Magazine (April 1933, vol. 3, no. 2). Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Magic Carp...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Magic Carpet Magazine (October 1933, vol. 3, no. 4). Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (May 1935, vol. 25, no. 5) featuring The Death Cry by Arthur B. Reeve. Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (March 1936, vol. 27, no. 3) featuring The Albino Deaths by Ronal Kayser. Cover art by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (December 1934, vol. 24, no. 6) featuring A Witch Shall be Born by Robert E. Howard. Cover by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tale...

English: Cover of the pulp magazine Weird Tales (April 1934, vol. 23, no. 4) featuring Satan’s Garden by E. Hoffmann Price. Cover by Margaret Brundage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

046a Weird Tales Apr-1934 Cover by Margaret Br...

046a Weird Tales Apr-1934 Cover by Margaret Brundage – Includes Satan’s Garden Part 1 of 2 by E. Hoffmann Price (Photo credit: California Cthulhu (Will Hart))

003c Oriental Stories Sum-1932 Cover by Margar...

003c Oriental Stories Sum-1932 Cover by Margaret Brundage Includes a Letter by E. Hoffmann Price (Photo credit: California Cthulhu (Will Hart))

Back in the day there was a woman named Margaret Brundage, and what is she famous for? Causing the whole nation to utter that word “scandelous”. How? Well her covers on pulp image magazines were racy and explosive.

She was active in politics, and an independent woman living in the age when men were the only ones entitled to take care of business.

Wanna see why she was so racy?

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Aliens and Pulp Images First Contact

Colorful and rich, the early pulp art covers were made to be drooled on. Pulp did not come to this world immaculately however, in fact it took a long time to get people into the art and science fiction world.

Science fiction books came to life in the 1920s and goes all the way to 1955.

The beginnings of Pulp

In the early beginnings of Pulp, people used books as a form of entertainment.What we call a magazine today was actually  referred to as a newspaper in the later 19th century. Basically, they were large and long sheets of paper, jam packed with information on the front and back. After printing technology stepped up they began to bind the papers into a format we recognize today as a magazine.

From 1820-1900, a period characterized as Victorian aesthetics, newspapers were filled with scrolls, illustrations and more. Color was too expensive to be mass produced so largely everything was black and white.

Scientific America was begun in the late 19th century and is still alive and kicking today.The covers of this magazine still looked like a newspaper for years until about 1900.

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Those who bought scientific american were exposed to ravishing concepts.

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Yes, they were able to think of the future’s horseless carriages and more.

Authors like Jules Verne From the Earth To The Moon c.1874 was filled with illustartions. It can actually be credited with early pulp images. Check out the interior pictures.

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The images were created with pen and ink. In this case black in is built up over the page or by scratch board.

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Soon after came something call America’s novels and with it the first image of a robot.

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Don’t forget you can become a robot on our Kickstarter campaign for just a $1.00!

So why did people buy this? Well the steam man for one was a huge draw! People liked the idea of a mechanical man of the future.

Then as the progression of the ages ensued we begin to see monsters, damsels in distress and ALIENS!!!

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Check out Science Wonder Storiesku-medium-1

 

Father’s Day Countdown!

The countdown is on. Only five days until it’s time to show your dad the appreciation & love he deserves.

You haven’t gotten your dad anything yet for Father’s Day?!
Don’t fret too much, you still have five days to figure out, but here at Pulp Images, we have a few ideas of what you can get your pops.

Become a backer for the Pulp Images Kickstarter campaign! Let him know that you’ve pledged to support our campaign and that in a few weeks when it wraps up, he’ll be the proud owner of a piece of pulp history.

So take a look at our Kickstarter Page for fabulous gift ideas. Here’s the general breakdown of what we can offer:

Pledge $1 or more get ROBOT Status. That mean’s your dad’s name can be on the Wall of Robots on Pulpimages.com!

Pledge $5 get a DIGITAL IMAGE

Pledge $12 or more Production poster: Receive one 18”x24”, full-color, production printed GALAXY poster embossed with the official PulpImages logo. + ROBOT Status + (Our thank you) 1 image (150 ppi) of your choice when catalog goes live (Jan 2014).

Pledge $20 and get an awesome tee designed by Grego! (seriously, help your dad out, give him some stylish duds).

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Pulp History: The Newsstand

 

Check out these amazing images of people from the Great Depression buying and reading Pulp! Our Kickstarter campaign could use your funding to help preserve these wonderful images.

 

Thanks to the federal government we have access to these images. Can you see the pulp art in any of them?

 

 

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